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Endophytic Actinobacteria for Chemical-free Tea

  • 05 Mar 2020
  • 2 min read

Why in News

Researchers at the Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology (IASST) Guwahati, have found that the endophytic actinobacteria can replace fertilizers & fungicides in tea.

  • Endophytic actinobacteria (predominantly free-living microorganisms) which live within a plant are found in diverse environments.
  • The Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology (IASST), Guwahati is an autonomous institute under Department of Science & Technology.

Key Points

  • Research findings
    • Endophytic actinobacteria have the potential to exhibit multiple growth-promoting traits that positively influence tea growth and production and can hence be used in the management and sustainability of Teacrop.
    • Application of endophytic Actinobacteria could reduce chemical inputs in Tea plantation.
  • In recent years, due to higher demand of chemical residue-free made tea by the importing countries, the export of tea has declined. The use of endophyticactino bacteria on tea plantations is expected to benefit the Indian tea market.

Tea

  • Tea (Camellia sinensis) plays an important role in the Indian economy as a major portion of the tea produced is exported.
  • India is the second largest tea producer in the world, right behind China.
  • Tea found in India is categorized into 3 types namely Assam tea (highest cultivation), Darjeeling tea (Superior quality tea) and Nilgiri tea (subtle and gentle flavors).
  • Growth Conditions: Tea requires well drained soil with a high amount of organic matter and pH 4.5 to 5.5. The performance of tea is excellent at elevations ranging from 1000 - 2500 m.Optimum temperature: 20-270 C.

Source: PIB

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