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Indian Economy

World Fisheries Day

  • 21 Nov 2020
  • 4 min read

Why in News

The World Fisheries Day is observed on the 21st November every year.

  • On the occasion of the World Fisheries Day, for the first time in the Fisheries Sector, the Government of India will award best performing States.

Key Points

  • World Fisheries Day is celebrated to demonstrate solidarity with all fisherfolk, fish farmers and concerned stakeholders throughout the world.
    • It was started in the year 1997 when “World Forum of Fish Harvesters & Fish Workers” met at New Delhi leading to formation of “World Fisheries Forum” with representatives from 18 countries and signed a declaration advocating for a global mandate of sustainable fishing practices and policies.
    • Aim: To draw attention to overfishing, habitat destruction and other serious threats to the sustainability of marine and inland resources.
  • Importance of Fisheries Sector:
    • Around 30 million to over 60 million people in the developing world are involved in inland fisheries; it is thought that about 50% are women.
    • Around 65% of fish caught from inland fisheries are from low-income food deficit countries.
    • More than 25% of world dietary protein is provided by the fish.
  • Importance of Fisheries for India:
    • India is the second major producer of fish through aquaculture in the world.
    • India is the 4th largest exporter of fish in the world as it contributes 7.7% to the global fish production.
    • Fish constituted about 10% of total exports from India and almost 20% of agriculture exports in 2017-18.
    • The fisheries and aquaculture production contribute around 1% to India’s GDP and over 5% to the agricultural GDP.
    • Around 28 million people are employed in the fisheries sector in India.
    • The sector has immense potential to more than double the fishers and fish farmers’ incomes, as envisioned by the government.
  • Challenges for Fisheries sector:
    • The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) points out that nearly 90% of the global marine fish stocks have either been fully exploited or overfished or depleted to the extent that recovery may not be biologically possible.
    • Discharge of harmful substances like plastics and other waste into water bodies that cause devastating consequences for aquatic life.
    • Changing climate.
  • Indian Government's Effort to Improve Fisheries:

Source:PIB

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