Online Courses (English)
This just in:

Indian Heritage & Culture

Nilgiri Tribals Tensed Over Destruction of Rock Art

  • 03 Jun 2019
  • 3 min read

40% of the rock paintings in Karikiyoor at Kil Kotagiri in the Nilgiri forests have been destroyed by trekkers, tourists, and vandals.

  • Irula tribal community, who have an ancestral link to the Nilgiri forest’s rock art site, are extremely angered at the damage by illegal trekkers.
  • Scripts on the rock paintings in Karikiyoor resemble the script found in Indus civilization sites of northern India.

About Irula Tribe

  • Irula people reside in northern districts of Tamil Nadu and in some parts of Kerala.
  • Tribes have their origin from ethnic groups of Southeast Asia and Australia.
  • They speak Irula language that is closely related to Dravidian language like Kannada and Tamil.
  • Irulas are among the Particularly vulnerable tribal group.
    • The PVTGs are the marginalized section of the Scheduled tribes of India and are relatively isolated, educationally and socio-economically backward, living in a habitat far away from amenities.
    • PVTG is not a constitutional category, nor are these constitutionally recognized communities.
    • It is a Government of India’s classification created with the purpose of enabling improvement in the conditions of certain communities with particularly low development.

Rock Art: Rock art is human-made markings placed on natural stone.

  • Rock art is often divided into three forms: petroglyphs, which are carved into the rock surface, pictographs, which are painted onto the surface, and earth figures, formed on the ground.
  • Rock art in India is extensively found in the caves of:
    • Bhimbetka caves: located between Hoshangabad and Bhopal, in the foothills of the Vindhya Mountains.
    • Bagh caves: located on the bank of Baghani river in the Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh.
    • Jogimara caves: paintings were created before the Ajanta and Bagh Caves and belong to Pre-Buddha caves.
      • Situated at Amarnath near the origin of Narmada, in Surguja in Chhattisgarh.
    • Armamalai caves: Armamalai cave paintings located in Vellore district of Tamil Nadu, are known for a Jain temple with ancient paintings, petroglyphs and rock art.
  • Significance:
    • The rock paintings serve, as a “historical record”, detailing the hunting habits and ways of life of the local communities.
    • Rock arts are used for ritualistic purpose by local residents.
    • Tribal communities rely on the rock arts for deriving their cultural connections by following the customs engraved in the rock art.
SMS Alerts
 

Please login or register to view note list

close

Please login or register to list article as bookmarked

close
 

Please login or register to make your note

close

Please login or register to list article as progressed

close

Please login or register to list article as bookmarked

close