हिंदी साहित्य: पेन ड्राइव कोर्स
This just in:

Science & Technology

NASA’s Dawn Mission

  • 03 Nov 2018
  • 2 min read

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft (launched in 2007) which orbited the two largest objects (Vesta and Ceres) in the asteroid belt has run out of fuel, ending a historic 11-year mission that unravelled many mysteries of our solar system.

  • Mission managers of Dawn Mission concluded that the spacecraft finally ran out of hydrazine, the fuel that enables the spacecraft to control its pointing.

Significance of the Mission

  • The astounding images and data that Dawn collected from Vesta and Ceres are critical to understanding the history and evolution of the solar system.
  • In 2011, when Dawn arrived at Vesta, the spacecraft became the first to orbit a body in the region between Mars and Jupiter.
  • In 2015, when Dawn went into orbit around Ceres, a dwarf planet that is also in the asteroid belt, the mission became the first to visit a dwarf planet and go into orbit around two destinations beyond Earth.
  • The data Dawn beamed back to Earth from its four science experiments enabled scientists to compare two planet-like worlds that evolved very differently.
  • Among its accomplishments, Dawn showed how important location was to the way objects in the early solar system formed and evolved.
  • Dawn also reinforced the idea that dwarf planets could have hosted oceans over a significant part of their history and potentially still do.
  • Dawn’s data sets will be deeply mined by scientists working on how planets grow and differentiate, and when and where life could have formed in our solar system.
  • Ceres and Vesta are important to the study of distant planetary systems, too, as they provide a glimpse of the conditions that may exist around young stars.
SMS Alerts
 

Please login or register to view note list

close

Please login or register to list article as bookmarked

close
 

Please login or register to make your note

close

Please login or register to list article as progressed

close

Please login or register to list article as bookmarked

close