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Global Employment Trends for Youth Report 2015
Oct 19, 2015

According to ILO’s Global Employment Trends for Youth Report the global youth unemployment rate has stabilized at 13 per cent following a period of rapid increase between 2007 and 2010 but it is still well above the pre-crisis level of 11.7 per cent.

Key Points

  • The report highlights a drop in the number of unemployed youth to 73.3 million in 2014. That is 3.3 million less than the crisis peak of 76.6 million in 2009.

  • Compared to 2012, the youth unemployment rate has decreased by 1.4 percentage points in Developed Economies and the European Union and by half a percentage point or less in Central and South-Eastern Europe (non-EU) and CIS, Latin America and the Caribbean and Sub-Saharan Africa.

  • The remaining regions–East Asia, South-East Asia and the Pacific, the Middle East and North Afric –saw an increase in the youth unemployment rate between 2012 and 2014, or no change in the case of South Asia.

  • Because of a shrinking youth labour force, the youth unemployment rate remains stubbornly high despite a decline in the number of unemployed youth. In fact, the rate is expected to creep up to 13.1 per cent in 2015.

  • Global shares of youth in the total labour force, whether employed or unemployed are decreasing over time. One reason is that more young people are participating in education.

  • Millions of young people in low-income countries continue to leave school to take up jobs when they are too young. According to the report, 31 per cent of youth in low-income countries have no educational qualifications at all, compared to 6 per cent in lower middle-income countries and 2 per cent in upper middle-income countries.

  • The report also highlights a persistent gender gap with the rates of young women’s participation in the labour market being significantly lower than those of young men in most regions. They continue to be also more exposed to unemployment than their male counterpart.

  • More young people in developed economies are now finding work but the quality of jobs is below their expectations. And still too many remain stuck in long-term unemployment.

  • In the European Union, more than one in three unemployed youth has been looking for work for more than one year. Developing economies continue to be plagued by structural underemployment, informal employment and working poverty. Working poverty (living on less than 2 dollar per day) has decreased over the past 20 years, it still affects 169 million (one in three) young workers in the developing world. The number increases to 286 million if the near poor are included (living on less than 4 dollar a day).


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