1. Basic Universal Values for Civil Services & their importance

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Dave_Here
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Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:08 pm

These are the bare minimum necessary ethical values that any working or aspiring Civil Servant should know and follow. We will discuss them one by one, not necessarily in any order, and we expect that you contribute to the discussion by asking questions, posting reading material, and/or by raising new lines of thought. Doing so will be beneficial to everyone, including yourself.


1.A

18/2/19: Duty to act objectively and impartially


:arrow: To act objectively in an official setting or capacity means that the person taking/making the decisions have to weigh in his options only after a careful consideration of the facts of the matter. While observing the facts, the official has to detach himself emotionally and as far as humanly possible - personally - from the decision making process.

[Impartiality - Treatment of different views or opinions equally and fairly]

:arrow: To act impartially in an official setting or capacity means that the person taking/making the decisions have to abstain from any kind of preferential or prejudicial thinking. Actions and decisions cannot be arbitrary at any cost if it has to be ethical.

[Arbitrary - Based on or subject to individual discretion or preference or sometimes impulse or caprice.]

[Caprice - A sudden desire]



We will continue this discussion tomorrow; kindly ask if you have anything, we'd be happy to help.
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Dave_Here
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Tue Feb 19, 2019 7:46 pm

19/2/19: Follow Up 1.A

Impartiality (also called evenhandedness or fair-mindedness) is a principle of justice holding that decisions should be based on objective criteria, rather than on the basis of bias, prejudice, or preferring the benefit to one person over another for improper reasons. [Source: Wikipedia]

“Impartiality is sometimes treated by philosophers as if it were equivalent to moral impartiality. Or, at the very least, the former word is often used, without the qualifying adjective ‘moral’, even when it is the particularly moral concept that is intended. This is misleading, since impartiality in its broadest sense is best understood as a formal notion, while moral impartiality in particular is a substantive concept – and one concerning which there is considerable dispute.” [Source: Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy]

[Formal - Being in accord with established forms and conventions and requirements (as e.g. of formal dress)]

[Substantive - Having a firm basis in reality and being therefore important, meaningful, or considerable; having substance: involving matters of major or practical importance to all concerned]



:arrow: The concept of impartiality - in philosophy:

The concept of impartiality Share-1.pdf
(90.11 KiB) Downloaded 31 times


Bernard Gert advocates the following definition of morality: Morality is an informal public system applying to all rational persons, governing behavior that affects others, and includes what are commonly known as the moral rules, ideals, and virtues and has the lessening of evil or harm as its goal.

Animal ethics: The argument from impartiality claims that if we considered the treatment of animals impartially, we would not accept treating them worse than humans.


Points to look out for:

Impartiality and Moral Impartiality are different concepts.
The difference between these have not yet been settled for good.
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Dave_Here
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Wed Feb 20, 2019 6:36 pm

20/2/19: Follow Up 1.A


"Impartiality" - in the legal system.


- In taking oath of office, judges, both of the Supreme Court and of the high courts, promise to perform their duties, to deliver justice, “without fear or favour, affection or ill-will”. While “fear and favour”, as Stephen Sedley, a former judge of the Court of Appeal of England and Wales, has written, are “enemies of independence, which is a state of being”, affection and ill-will “undermine impartiality, which is a state of mind”.

The purpose of recusal, Mr. Sedley added, is to underpin these twin pillars of independence and impartiality. - [The Hindu Editorial]

:arrow: https://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/n ... 305917.ece



BANGALORE PRINCIPLES OF JUDICIAL CONDUCT


The Bangalore Principles of Judicial Conduct identify six core values of the judiciary – Independence, Impartiality, Integrity, Propriety, Equality, Competence and Diligence.


THE FOLLOWING PRINCIPLES are intended to establish standards for ethical conduct of judges. They are designed to provide guidance to judges and to afford the judiciary a framework for regulating judicial conduct. They are also intended to assist members of the executive and the legislature, and lawyers and the public in general, to better understand and support the judiciary. These principles presuppose that judges are accountable for their conduct to appropriate institutions established to maintain judicial standards, which are themselves independent and impartial, and are intended to supplement and not to derogate from existing rules of law and conduct which bind the judge.




Long Read:

:arrow: https://frontline.thehindu.com/cover-st ... 055186.ece
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